The Daily Energy

By Editors

The price of gas may be cratering, causing gas investors to pull back on their drilling plans, but a report issued by the American Coalition for Clean Coal says that half the households in the country had their energy costs double over the last decade. The study says energy consumes 1/5th of the income of these homes and that half the households earning less than $50,000 face even higher costs if government regulators keep closing down coal plants. The study, of course, supports more coal energy.

Fisker Automobile’s decision to suspend work on its Delaware assembly plant has set off some echoes of Solyndra but company officials say it’s not that bad. Only 26 workers have been affected. The company is trying to renegotiate its $529 million loan from the Department of Energy. Fisker’s main product is the all-electric Karma (above), which sells for $100,000. Buyers, of course, will be the beneficiaries if the company manages to survive.

The energy dominoes were falling across the Middle East as Turkey temporarily suspended gas supplies to Greece. The Turks are having problems because Iran – faced with an oil boycott - wants a better price for its gas. The Turks also claimed that technical failures had halted the flow of gas from Azerbaijan. The Greeks, at the end of the pipeline, are suffering. The incident reveals just how vulnerable European energy supplies have become, stretching across thousands of miles of political volatile territories.

Nuclear power suffered a setback as the Czechs bowed to tremendous pressure from the European Union and backed away from plans to build several new reactors. The news may affect Germany the most, since it is becoming ever more dependent on imported electricity as it abandons its own nuclear reactors. The Byron 2 reactor is back up in Illinois but California’s San Onofre remains offline as utility officials inspect rapidly wearing pipes. A couple of New Hampshire Democrats vowed to oppose the relicensing of the Seabrook Reactor but in Vermont reports that fish near Vermont Yankee had become radioactive were cast in doubt by a study showing that fish in remote parts of the state have the same levels of cesium-137 and strontium-90.