February 27, 2013

The Shaky Logic of U.S. Natural Gas Exports

Kurt Cobb, Christian Science Monitor


mellofmjamaica.com

With U.S. natural gas production having risen more than 25 percent from its nadir in 2005, natural gas producers are pushing for an end to limits on U.S. natural gas exports. The growth in supplies comes primarily from previously inaccessible shale deposits deep in the Earth, a development that has convinced many people that the country is now entering a new era of natural gas abundance.

Trouble is, the United States remains an importer of natural gas. Through November 2012 the country imported 12.5 percent of its natural gas consumption for the year, mostly from Read Full Article ››


TAGGED: LNG Exports, Natural Gas, Economy, Christian Science Monitor

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