April 3, 2012

Solar Debacles, From Germany to California

Todd Woody, Forbes


AP Photo

California may be the solar Promised Land but Delaware is where those big green dreams go to die.

On Monday, Solar Trust of America became the latest solar developer to file for bankruptcy in Delaware federal court, putting into jeopardy photovoltaic power plant projects utilities were counting on to generate 2,000 megawatts of electricity – enough t0 light hundreds of thousands of homes at peak output. Among the projects was what would have been the world’s largest solar station, the Blythe Solar Power Project, a 1,000-megawatt power plant to be built in the Mojave Desert that had received a $2.1 billion federal loan guarantee offer.

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TAGGED: Solar Energy, Germany

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