March 16, 2012

Wind Energy Is Not Cheap Energy

Bjorn Lomborg, Project Syndicate


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Efforts to stem global warming have nurtured a strong urge worldwide to deploy renewable energy. As a result, the use of wind turbines has increased ten-fold over the past decade, with wind power often touted as the most cost-effective green opportunity. According to Connie Hedegaard, the European Union’s commissioner for climate action, “People should believe that [wind power] is very, very cheap. . ."

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TAGGED: Energy Subsidies, United Kingdom, Carbon Emissions, Renewable Energy Initiatives, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy, Project Syndicate

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