March 16, 2012

Loosening China's Grip on Rare Earths

Editorial, Washington Post


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The People's Republica of China controls 97 percent of the world’s supply of rare-earth metals. Lucky for China — but not so lucky for the rest of the world, because these 17 minerals, with names like europium and neodymium, are used in the manufacture of everything from clean-energy devices to the U.S. military’s precision-guided munitions. . .

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TAGGED: Alternative Energy, Global Energy Market, World Trade Organization, Rare Earths, China, Washington Post

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