March 15, 2012

Helping South Sudan Cost Us Cheap Oil

Benny Avni, New York Post


AP Photo

The politicians aren’t talking about it, but one big reason we’re paying more for gas is a bipartisan US foreign-policy success — the independence of South Sudan. The oil-rich nation stopped pumping in late January because its petroleum must go to market via Sudan proper, its former overlord, and Sudan was charging exorbitant fees for transit. . .

Read Full Article ››

TAGGED: South Sudan, Oil, New York Post, Energy Security, Foreign Oil, Oil Prices, Global Oil Market

RECOMMENDED ARTICLES

October 17, 2013
From Peak Oil to Fossil Fuel Euphoria
Michael Klare, OilPrice.com
For years, energy analysts had been anticipating an imminent decline in global oil supplies. Suddenly, they’re singing a new song: Fossil fuels growing scarce? Don’t even think about it! The news couldn’t be better:... more ››
October 17, 2013
Oil Prices Would Skyrocket w/out U.S. Shale
James Clad, The Hill
Unheralded and unnoticed, American oil producers are helping stabilize global oil prices, which would be a lot higher if new U.S. oil supply, mostly from shale, weren’t reaching world markets. . . more ››
October 22, 2013
Forty Years Ago, Scarcity Was Our Reality
Marita Noon, Energy Tribune
October 17 was the fortieth anniversary of the oil embargo slapped on America by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). That action changed the entire geopolitical map by taking the power from the United States... more ››
October 21, 2013
Russia, American & the Arab Oil Curse
Raghida Dergham, Huff Post
The compass of the geopolitical strategic balance of power is turning towards a qualitative relationship between the United States and Russia, following a phase of tension in their relationship, the features of which had clearly... more ››
October 25, 2013
Libyan Militias' Most Valuable Hostage
Wil Crisp, Christian Science Monitor
Militias have seized control of Libya's oil facilities to extract concessions from the government, bringing national oil production down to a third of what it was at the beginning of 2013. . . more ››