December 2, 2011

Can Private Money Spur Renewables? Ask the Military

Editors, Knovel


Knovel

The U.S. Department of Defense is one of the biggest users of renewable energy in the world, and it announced this week it is teaming with a California-based company in an effort to drastically reduce its reliance on fossil fuels. Though the federal government often helps finance such large-scale projects, private companies are stepping in, underscoring a significant shift in the clean energy sector.

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TAGGED: renewable energy, Bank of America, investment bank, pv panels, rooftop solar, US military

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