August 1, 2011

Shale Gas & U.S. National Security

Baker Institute, James A. Baker III Institute


wikipedia

The past decade has yielded substantial change in the natural gas industry. Specifically, there has been rapid development of technology allowing the recovery of natural gas from shale formations. Since 2000, rapid growth in the production of natural gas from shale formations in North America has dramatically altered the global natural gas market landscape. Indeed, the emergence of shale gas is perhaps the most intriguing development in global energy markets in recent memory . . .

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TAGGED: LNG, national security, U.S. energy policy, natural gas, shale gas production

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